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The Coastal Health District of Georgia serves the counties of Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long & McIntosh

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Long County Board of Health Discusses Flu; Staffing

Updates on flu season, the 2018 Long County Health Department budget, and health department staffing topped the agenda items at Long County Board of Health meeting held in early March.

Board members RoseZena Baggs, Dr. Robert Waters, Mike Riddle, Florence Baggs, Kelly Wingate, and Cathy Stapleton were in attendance along with health department staff and several members of the eight-county Coastal Health District. Coastal Health District Health Director, Dr. Lawton Davis, updated the Board on what has been a long, terrible flu season. Although flu activity is finally starting to decrease across the region and state, there have been 25 flu-associated deaths in the Coastal Health District. None of those deaths occurred in Long County.

Coastal Health District Administrator, Brent Jordan, informed the board that there are no proposed cuts to the Long County Health Department budget. Jordan also presented the revised 2018 fiscal year budget. The proposed 2019 budget will be presented to the Board for approval at the next meeting scheduled for June 14.

The Long County Health Department has a new county nurse manager. Lisa Palmer, R.N., recently joined the health department but is not a newcomer to public health. Palmer joined public health in 1991 as a perinatal case manager and worked with all public health programs for 17 years before joining the Liberty County School System.

“I’m thrilled to be able to come back to public health and look forward to serving the residents of Long County,” said Palmer.

The Long County Health Department is now fully staffed and open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The health department offers a variety of services including immunizations for children and adults, breast and cervical cancer screening for low-income or uninsured women, testing and treatment for sexually transmitted infections, health checks for children, and the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program which provides nutritious foods and nutrition education for low and moderate-income women and children who are at risk of developing nutrition related problems. More information on health department services can be found at gachd.org/long or by calling the health department at 545-2107.

Long County Environmental Health Manager, Linus Woodard notified the Board that there have been 51 septic system permits issued, 17 well water tests performed, nine well water permits issued, and several food service inspections completed since the last meeting. The revised swimming pool regulations will be presented to the Board at the June meeting.

Additional discussion between public health staff and board members took place regarding dangerous dog hearings. The Long County Board of Commissioners recently voted to have members of the Board of Health oversee the animal hearing board should a dangerous dog incident happen. The Board of Health voted on and approved Mike Riddle and Dr. Lawton Davis to lead the animal hearing board.

All Long County Board of Health meetings are open to the public. The next meeting is scheduled for 11 a.m. on Thursday, June 14, at the Long County Health Department located at 584 N. Macon Street in Ludowici.

 

 

 

Flu Information

Flu is widespread in Georgia, and more than three hundred individuals have been hospitalized with flu-related illness. The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) has confirmed 25 flu-related deaths so far, but that number is expected to increase.

Flu symptoms and their intensity can vary from person to person, and can include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. If you think you have the flu, call or visit your doctor.

In some cases, healthcare providers may recommend the use of antivirals such as Tamiflu® or Relenza®. Antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid, an inhaled powder or an intravenous solution) that fight against the flu in your body. Antiviral drugs work best for treatment when they are started within two days of getting sick. Antivirals are used to treat those at high-risk for flu complications – young children, the elderly, individuals with underlying medical conditions and women who are pregnant. Most otherwise-healthy people who get the flu, however, do not need to be treated with antiviral drugs.

The predominant strain of flu circulating in Georgia and around the country is influenza A (H3N2). This strain can be particularly hard on the very young, people over age 65, or those with existing medical conditions. H3N2 is one of the strains contained in this year’s flu vaccine along with two or three others, depending on the vaccine.

There are other things you can do to help prevent the spread of flu:

  • Avoid close contact with sick people.
  • Try to cough or sneeze into the corner of your elbow and not your hand, or cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu (door knobs, desk surfaces, computer keyboards, etc.)
  • If you are caring for a sick individual at home, keep them away from common areas of the house and other people as much as possible. If you have more than one bathroom, have the sick person use one and well people use the other. Clean the sick room and the bathroom once a day with household disinfectant. Thoroughly clean linens, eating utensils, and dishes used by the sick person before reusing.
  • If you are sick, stay home from school or work. Flu sufferers should be free of a fever, without the use of a fever reducer, for at least 24 hours before returning to school or work.

For Parents
Flu Guide for Parents
Is it a cold or the flu?

For Schools
Information for Schools & Childcare Providers
How to Clean & Disinfect
Cover Your Cough Flier

For Healthcare Providers
Resources for Health Professionals

For additional flu information and resources,
click HERE.

Spanish version of The “red” cover your cough poster for health care facilities asking people to cover their cough and clean their hands.

 

It’s Not Too Late to Get a Flu Shot

Flu is widespread throughout Georgia and more than 300 people have been hospitalized with flu-related illness across the state. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), flu season usually peaks between December and February; however, flu season can last into spring.

“This has been an extremely rough flu season and the entire country has been hit hard,” said Health Director for the Coastal Health District, Lawton Davis, M.D. “It’s not too late to get vaccinated against the flu and we want to encourage those who have not been vaccinated to take advantage of this opportunity.”

Flu symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills, fatigue, and sometime diarrhea or vomiting.

There are other things we can all do to prevent getting or spreading the flu:

  • Avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you get sick with flu-like illness, stay home for at least 24 hours after the fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. The fever should be gone without the use of fever-reducing medications.
  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  • Try to cough or sneeze into the corner of your elbow and not your hand, or cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.

For more information on this year’s flu season and the flu vaccine, go to cdc.gov/flu.

Additional Flu Information

Flu Inactive Vaccine Information Statement

Flu Inactive Vaccine Information Statement SPANISH

Flu Guide for Parents

Widespread Flu in Georgia: Protect Yourself and Prevent the Spread of Flu

From the Georgia Department of Public Health
January 12, 2018

If you have not gotten a flu shot yet, do not wait any longer! Flu is widespread in Georgia, and more than three hundred individuals have been hospitalized with flu-related illness. The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) has confirmed four flu-related deaths so far, but that number is expected to increase.

The predominant strain of flu circulating in Georgia and around the country is influenza A (H3N2). This strain can be particularly hard on the very young, people over age 65, or those with existing medical conditions. H3N2 is one of the strains contained in this year’s flu vaccine along with two or three others, depending on the vaccine.

“It is not too late to get a flu shot,” says J. Patrick O’Neal, M.D., DPH commissioner. “Every individual over the age of six months should get a flu vaccine – not just for their own protection, but to protect others around them who may be more vulnerable to the flu and its complications.”

Flu symptoms and their intensity can vary from person to person, and can include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. If you think you have the flu, call or visit your doctor.

In some cases, healthcare providers may recommend the use of antivirals such as Tamiflu® or Relenza®. Antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid, an inhaled powder or an intravenous solution) that fight against the flu in your body. Antiviral drugs work best for treatment when they are started within two days of getting sick. Antivirals are used to treat those at high-risk for flu complications – young children, the elderly, individuals with underlying medical conditions and women who are pregnant. Most otherwise-healthy people who get the flu, however, do not need to be treated with antiviral drugs.

There are other things you can do to help prevent the spread of flu – tried and true measures your mother taught you.

  • Frequent and thorough hand-washing with soap and warm water. Alcohol based gels are the next best thing if you don’t have access to soap and
  • Cover your nose and mouth when coughing and sneezing to help prevent the spread of the flu. Use a tissue or cough or sneeze into the crook of your elbow or arm.
  • Avoid touching your face as flu germs can get into the body through mucus membranes of the nose, mouth and
  • If you are sick, stay home from school or work. Flu sufferers should be free of a fever, without the use of a fever reducer, for at least 24 hours before returning to school or

If you are caring for a sick individual at home, keep them away from common areas of the house and other people as much as possible. If you have more than one bathroom, have the sick person use one and well people use the other. Clean the sick room and the bathroom once a day with household disinfectant. Thoroughly clean linens, eating utensils, and dishes used by the sick person before reusing.

To learn more about influenza log on to www.flu.gov.

 

About the Georgia Department of Public Health

The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is the lead agency in preventing disease, injury and disability; promoting health and well-being; and preparing for and responding to disasters. DPH’s main functions include: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Maternal and Child Health, Infectious Disease and Immunization, Environmental Health, Epidemiology, Emergency Preparedness and Response, Emergency Medical Services, Pharmacy, Nursing, Volunteer Health Care, the Office of Health Equity, Vital Records, and the State Public Health Laboratory. For more information about DPH visit www.dph.ga.gov.

Flu Vaccination: The Best Protection Against the Flu

ATLANTA – The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is urging Georgians to get vaccinated against flu. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against the flu, so it’s important to take preventive measures now.

“The single most effective way to prevent the flu is the flu vaccine. Every healthy individual over the age of six months should get a flu vaccine, unless there are underlying medical conditions. In those cases, patients should consult their physician,” said Dr. J. Patrick O’Neal, commissioner, Georgia Department of Public Health. “The holidays bring gatherings with family and friends and increase the likelihood of spreading the flu. Now is the time to get vaccinated.”

Even if the vaccine is not a perfect match, it can still help lessen the severity and length of flu symptoms if you do get sick, according to Dr. O’Neal.

Symptoms of flu include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, headache, chills and fatigue. One of the most pronounced flu symptoms is an overall feeling of achiness and malaise that comes on quickly.

There are other things you can do to help protect against flu, including:

  • Frequent and thorough hand-washing. Alcohol based gels are the next best thing if there is no access to soap and water.
  • Covering your nose and mouth when coughing and sneezing to help prevent the spread of the flu. Use a tissue or cough or sneeze into the crook of your elbow or arm.
  • Avoid touching your face as flu germs can get into the body through mucus membranes of the nose, mouth and eyes.
  • If you are sick, stay home from school or work. Flu sufferers should be free of fever without the use of a fever reducer for at least 24 hours before returning to school or work.

If you do get sick and think you may have the flu, contact your health care provider right away. There are medications that can be used to treat flu but they are most effective when taken within 48 hours of the onset of flu symptoms.

You can also track flu activity in Georgia at dph.georgia.gov/flu-activity-georgia. The page is updated weekly. For more information about flu and how to prevent it, log on to flu.gov.

Camden County Drive-Through Flu Clinic November 4

 

The Camden County Health Department will hold a drive-through flu vaccination clinic from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m., Saturday, November 4, at Lowes located at  1410 East Boone Avenue in Kingsland. Getting vaccinated against the flu is recommended for everyone six months of age and older. It takes about two weeks after getting a flu shot for the vaccine to provide the body protection against the flu. Flu season is unpredictable so residents are encouraged to get vaccinated now.

For more information or to download the consent form ahead of time, click HERE.

Camden County Drive-Thru Flu Clinic

McIntosh County Drive-Thru Flu Clinic

McIntosh Co. Health Dept. Drive-Through Flu Clinic Oct. 17

The McIntosh County Health Department will hold a drive-through flu vaccination clinic from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., on Tuesday, October 17, at the McIntosh County Health Department located at 1335 GA Hwy. 57 in Townsend.

The McIntosh County Health Department will hold a drive-through flu vaccination clinic to make it as convenient as possible. Getting vaccinated against the flu is recommended for everyone six months of age and older. It takes about two weeks after getting a flu shot for the vaccine to provide the body protection against the flu. Flu season is unpredictable so residents are encouraged to get vaccinated now.

For more information or to download the consent form ahead of time, click HERE.

Flu Vaccine Available at Health Departments

Health departments in Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, and McIntosh counties now have injectable flu vaccine available. Getting the flu vaccine is the best way to protect yourself, your family, and your community from the flu.

Getting vaccinated against the flu is recommended for everyone six months of age and older. It takes about two weeks after getting a flu shot for the vaccine to provide the body protection against the flu. While getting the flu vaccine is the best way to prevent the flu, there are other things we can all do every day to prevent getting or spreading the flu:

  • Avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you get sick with flu-like illness, stay home for at least 24 hours after the fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. The fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.
  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  • Try to cough or sneeze into the corner of your elbow and not your hand or cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.

For more information or to download the consent form ahead of time, go to your county health department web page and click on the Flu Vaccination Information link under County Information.