The Coastal Health District of Georgia serves the counties of Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long & McIntosh

Glynn News


Mosquito-borne Virus Activity Detected in Glynn County; Officials Advise Taking Protective Measures

Glynn County Public Works has confirmed that samples of mosquitoes collected in the county have tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV). This indicates that WNV is actively circulating in local mosquito populations this year. No human cases of WNV have been confirmed in any Coastal Health District counties, including Glynn. Glynn County is being actively treated for mosquitoes. Spraying will be conducted on the evenings of July 20, 21, and 22, weather permitting.

WNV is transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes and can cause mild to serious illness. Mosquitoes that carry the West Nile Virus are more likely to bite during the evening, night, and early morning. The Glynn County Health Department and Glynn County Public Works officials urge residents to take appropriate precautions now and throughout the summer to minimize mosquitoes around their property.

One of the most effective ways of preventing mosquito breeding and thus the spread of mosquito-borne viruses is controlling the mosquito population by getting rid of standing water around the home and in the yard. Residents are urged to clean up around their homes, yards, and communities and get rid of unnecessary items that can hold water and turn into mosquito breeding grounds. One way to do this is “Tip ‘n Toss.” After every rainfall, tip out water in flowerpots, planters, children’s toys, wading pools, buckets, and anything else that may be holding water. If it holds water and you don’t need it (old tires, bottles, cans), toss it out. It’s also a good idea to change water frequently in outdoor pet dishes, change bird bath water at least twice a week,and avoid using saucers under outdoor potted plants.

For containers without lids or that are too big to Tip ‘n Toss (garden pools, etc.), use larvicides such as Mosquito Dunks© or Mosquito Torpedoes© and follow the label instructions. These larvicides will not hurt birds or animals. In addition, clean out gutters, remove piles of leaves, and keep vegetation cut low to prevent landing sites for adult mosquitoes.

Homeowners associations and neighborhoods, along with city and county governments, are encouraged to sponsor community cleanup days.

Residents are always encouraged to follow the 5Ds of mosquito bite prevention:

  • Dusk/Dawn – Avoid dusk and dawn activities during the summer when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Dress – Wear loose-fitting, long sleeved shirts and pants to reduce the amount of exposed skin.
  • DEET – Cover exposed skin with an insect repellent containing the DEET, which is the most effective repellent against mosquito bites.
  • Drain – Empty any containers holding standing water – buckets, barrels, flower pots, tarps – because they are breeding grounds for virus-carrying mosquitoes.
  • Doors – Make sure doors and windows are in good repair and fit tightly, and fix torn or damaged screens to keep mosquitoes out of the house.

 

Environmental Health Reaches Out to Microbladers Regarding New Law

Environmental Health managers in Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, and McIntosh counties are reaching out to microblading artists to encourage them to apply for permits. In May, Georgia Governor Nathan Deal signed a bill permitting microblading – temporary cosmetic tattooing of eyebrows – as a legal form of tattooing. The bill was signed into law and took effect July 1. Previously, the practice of microblading was prohibited under Georgia law.

Environmental Health offices in all eight Coastal Health District counties have locally adopted tattoo rules to help eliminate public health risk factors, confirm sanitization practices, ensure after-care instructions are provided for clients, and minimize risk of disease. Microblading now falls within those rules. As with traditional tattoo artists, microbladers will have to abide by certain regulations to get permitted.

“Our number one goal is to make sure that anyone performing microblading is following procedures that will help protect the health of those receiving services,” said Coastal Health District Environmental Health Director, Brant Phelps. “Microbladers can now apply for permits through their local environmental health office and are encouraged to do so as soon as possible.”

For more information on the new law, go to legis.ga.gov/legislation. Contact information for local environmental health offices can be found HERE.

 

Mosquito-Borne Virus Activity Widespread in Chatham County

Chatham County Mosquito Control has confirmed that samples of mosquitoes collected across Chatham County have tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV). Mosquito Control confirmed last week that mosquito samples in Pooler tested positive for WNV. Once WNV activity is detected in mosquitoes it is an indication that the virus is actively circulating in local mosquito populations – regardless of the specific location of positive mosquito pools. The latest samples collected around the county confirm that fact. Recent weather patterns have not allowed Mosquito Control to conduct control operations; therefore, weekend missions will be scheduled. Residents should expect to see Mosquito Control’s low flying, yellow helicopters on a regular basis throughout the county this weekend between the hours of 7:30 p.m. and 9 p.m.

No human cases of WNV have been confirmed in any Coastal Health District counties, including Chatham. About 80% of the people who get WNV never even know it because they don’t develop symptoms. About 1 in 5 people who are infected will develop a fever with other symptoms such as headache, body aches, joint pains, vomiting, diarrhea, or rash.

WNV is transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes and can cause mild to serious illness. Mosquitoes that carry the West Nile Virus are more likely to bite during the evening, night, and early morning. The Chatham County Health Department and Chatham County Mosquito Control urge residents to take appropriate precautions now and throughout the summer to minimize mosquitoes around their property.

One of the most effective ways of preventing mosquito breeding and thus the spread of mosquito-borne viruses is controlling the mosquito population by getting rid of standing water around the home and in the yard. Residents are urged to clean up around their homes, yards, and communities and get rid of unnecessary items that can hold water and turn into mosquito breeding grounds. One way to do this is “Tip ‘n Toss.” After every rainfall, tip out water in flowerpots, planters, children’s toys, wading pools, buckets, and anything else that may be holding water. If it holds water and you don’t need it (old tires, bottles, cans), toss it out. It’s also a good idea to change water frequently in outdoor pet dishes, change bird bath water at least twice a week and avoid using saucers under outdoor potted plants.

For containers without lids or that are too big to Tip ‘n Toss (garden pools, etc.), use larvicides such as Mosquito Dunks© or Mosquito Torpedoes© and follow the label instructions. These larvicides will not hurt birds or animals. In addition, clean out gutters, remove piles of leaves, and keep vegetation cut low to prevent landing sites for adult mosquitoes.

Homeowners associations and neighborhoods, along with city and county governments, are encouraged to sponsor community cleanup days.

Residents are always encouraged to follow the 5Ds of mosquito bite prevention:

  • Dusk/Dawn – Avoid dusk and dawn activities during the summer when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Dress – Wear loose-fitting, long sleeved shirts and pants to reduce the amount of exposed skin.
  • DEET – Cover exposed skin with an insect repellent containing the DEET, which is the most effective repellent against mosquito bites.
  • Drain – Empty any containers holding standing water – buckets, barrels, flower pots, tarps – because they are breeding grounds for virus-carrying mosquitoes.
  • Doors – Make sure doors and windows are in good repair and fit tightly, and fix torn or damaged screens to keep mosquitoes out of the house.

 

 

 

 

 

Mosquito-borne Virus Activity Detected in Chatham County; Officials Advise Taking Protective Measures

Chatham County Mosquito Control has confirmed that samplings of mosquitoes collected in western Chatham County (Pooler area) have tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV). This indicates that WNV is actively circulating in local mosquito populations this year. Mosquito control personnel are surveying all areas of Chatham County and scheduling control operations as required. No human cases of WNV have been confirmed in any Coastal Health District counties, including Chatham.

WNV is transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes and can cause mild to serious illness. Mosquitoes that carry the West Nile Virus are more likely to bite during the evening, night, and early morning. The Chatham County Health Department and Chatham County Mosquito Control urge residents to take appropriate precautions now and throughout the summer to minimize mosquitoes around their property.

One of the most effective ways of preventing mosquito breeding and thus the spread of mosquito-borne viruses is controlling the mosquito population by getting rid of standing water around the home and in the yard. Residents are urged to clean up around their homes, yards, and communities and get rid of unnecessary items that can hold water and turn into mosquito breeding grounds. One way to do this is “Tip ‘n Toss.” After every rainfall, tip out water in flowerpots, planters, children’s toys, wading pools, buckets, and anything else that may be holding water. If it holds water and you don’t need it (old tires, bottles, cans), toss it out. It’s also a good idea to change water frequently in outdoor pet dishes, change bird bath water at least twice a week, and avoid using saucers under outdoor potted plants.

For containers without lids or that are too big to Tip ‘n Toss (garden pools, etc.), use larvicides such as Mosquito Dunks© or Mosquito Torpedoes© and follow the label instructions. These larvicides will not hurt birds or animals. In addition, clean out gutters, remove piles of leaves, and keep vegetation cut low to prevent landing sites for adult mosquitoes.

Homeowners associations and neighborhoods, along with city and county governments, are encouraged to sponsor community cleanup days.

Residents are always encouraged to follow the 5Ds of mosquito bite prevention:

  • Dusk/Dawn – Avoid dusk and dawn activities during the summer when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Dress – Wear loose-fitting, long sleeved shirts and pants to reduce the amount of exposed skin.
  • DEET – Cover exposed skin with an insect repellent containing the DEET, which is the most effective repellent against mosquito bites.
  • Drain – Empty any containers holding standing water – buckets, barrels, flower pots, tarps – because they are breeding grounds for virus-carrying mosquitoes.
  • Doors – Make sure doors and windows are in good repair and fit tightly, and fix torn or damaged screens to keep mosquitoes out of the house.

 

Chatham County Mosquito Control is actively treating all areas of Chatham County for mosquitoes. Residents should expect to see Mosquito Control’s low flying, yellow helicopters on a regular basis throughout the county.

 

Rabies Precautions Issued Following Raccoon Attack on St. Simons

A raccoon scratched and bit a resident while she was standing in her driveway in the Island Club area of St. Simons Island on Sunday, July 8. Although the raccoon has not been caught, the actions of the animal indicate that it likely has rabies. The resident is seeking follow-up care from her healthcare provider.

Several species of wild animals that are native to coastal Georgia – including raccoons, foxes, and bats – can carry rabies. Rabies is a potentially deadly virus that is primarily spread by infected animals. The Glynn County Environmental Health office offers these tips to protect you and your family from rabies:

  • Avoid contact with animals you don’t know.
  • Make sure your pets receive the proper immunizations. Dogs and cats should get rabies vaccines by four months of age, followed by a booster shot one year later, and another one every year as prescribed by your veterinarian.
  • Do not handle, feed, or unintentionally attract wild animals with open garbage cans or by leaving pet food out at night.
  • Never adopt wild animals or bring them into your home. Do not try to nurse sick animals to health. Call animal control or a properly licensed animal rescue agency for assistance.
  • Teach children to never handle unfamiliar animals, wild or domestic, even if they appear friendly. “Love your own, leave other animals alone” is a good principle for children to learn.

Symptoms of rabies in animals include a change in behavior, biting, aggression, showing no fear of natural enemies (such as humans), foaming at the mouth, and paralysis. Warmer weather increases the possibility of coming across wild animals – many of which can carry rabies – so residents are encouraged to be especially vigilant during summer months.

If an animal ever bites you, seek medical care immediately and contact Glynn County Animal Control at 912-554-7500 and the Glynn County Environmental Health office at 279-2940.

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Health Departments Modify Hours

The hours of operation at health departments in Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, and McIntosh counties will change slightly beginning July 1 to make it more convenient for clients to come in for services. The Fort Stewart WIC clinic will also have modified hours. Click on your county for an updated hours of operation.

In Chatham and Glynn counties, the vital records offices (death and birth certificates) will follow the same hours of operation as the health departments. The environmental health offices in  Camden and McIntosh counties will also adjust hours beginning July 1. The Chatham County environmental health office will be open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. The office will physically close at 2 p.m. on Fridays; however, clients can schedule appointments in advance to take place after 2 p.m.

Health department services include child and adult immunizations, testing and treatment for sexually transmitted diseases, family planning services, child health services, the Women, Infant, and Children’s (WIC) nutrition program, Breast and Cervical Cancer Program (BCCP) and more.

Fruit Recall

There is a recall by Caito Foods of fresh cut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe, & fresh-cut mixed fruit with the same melons because they may be contaminated with Salmonella. Georgia is one of the states where the products were distributed.

Get more information and a complete list of the recalled products here: https://bit.ly/2LGvreT

Back to School Clinics Scheduled

School will be back in session before we know it and parents are encouraged to get their children the necessary immunizations and screenings now to avoid the back to school rush and longer wait times. Several health departments in coastal Georgia have scheduled back to school clinics in July:

Camden County Health Department*
1501 Georgia Avenue, Woodbine
1 p.m. – 4 p.m., Tuesday, July 24
*(Free Eye, Ear, Dental & Nutrition Screens)

Camden County Health Department*
905 Dilworth Street, St. Marys
1 p.m. – 4 p.m., Thursday, July 26
*(Free Eye, Ear, Dental & Nutrition Screens)

Chatham County Health Department*
1395 Eisenhower Drive, Savannah
8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Thursday, July 19
8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Thursday, July 26
*(Free Eye, Ear, Dental & Nutrition Screens)

Liberty County Health Department
1113 E. Oglethorpe Hwy., Hinesville
8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m., Thursday, July 19
8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m., Thursday, July 26
8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Monday, July 30

Long County Health Department
8 a.m. – 7 p.m., Thursday, July 19
584 N. Macon Street, Ludowici
(Closed for lunch from 12 p.m. – 1 p.m.)

McIntosh County Health Department
1335 GA Hwy. 57, Townsend
8 a.m. – 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 17
McIntosh County Health Department

Students entering a Georgia school for the first time – no matter what the grade level –  must have a completed Certificate of Vision, Hearing, Dental, and Nutrition screening form. “First time” means never enrolled in a Georgia school before at any time in their lives.

In addition, children born on or after January 1, 2002 who are attending seventh grade and new entrants into Georgia schools in grades 8 through 12 must have received one dose of Tdap vaccine and one dose of meningococcal vaccine. (“New entrant” means any child entering any school in Georgia for the first time or entering after having been absent from a Georgia school for more than 12 months or one school year).

Also, it is recommended that all kids who are 11 or 12 years old get two shots of HPV vaccine six to twelve months apart. Adolescents who receive their two shots less than five months apart will require a third dose of HPV vaccine. HPV vaccine protects against cancers caused by human papillomavirus.

Students at scheduled back to school clinics will be seen on a first come, first served basis and no appointment is necessary.

All health departments in Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, and McIntosh counties offer eye, ear, dental, and nutrition screens as well as immunizations all year round.

Free HIV Testing Events Scheduled for Chatham; Glynn

The Coastal Health District HIV Prevention Program will offer free HIV testing on June 27 in observance of National HIV Testing Day. Testing events will take place from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the following locations:

CHATHAM COUNTY:
Walgreens, 2109 E. Victory Drive, Savannah
Walgreens, 11509 Abercorn St., Savannah
Walgreens, 4210 Augusta Rd., Garden City

GLYNN COUNTY
Walgreens, 4575 Altama Ave., Brunswick

All testing is completely confidential and results will be available in one minute. A follow-up visit will be scheduled for anyone who tests positive and counseling will be made available to those individuals.

The first 25 people who come for testing at each Walgreens location will receive a gift card.

The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates around 1.2 million people in the United States are living with HIV, and one in eight people don’t know they have it. Nearly 45,000 people find out they have HIV every year. In Georgia, the risk of HIV diagnosis is 1 in 51. National HIV Testing Week is an opportunity to raise awareness, encourage people to get the facts, tested, get involved, and get linked to care and treatment services. The Coastal Health District is pleased to offer free HIV testing as part of this global effort. As a reminder, HIV testing is free at all health departments in Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, and McIntosh counties and available Monday through Friday during regular health department hours of operation.

Anyone with questions about testing can call Diane DeVore at (912) 644-5828 or e-mail Diane.Devore@dph.ga.gov.

Feral Cat in Glynn Co. Tests Positive for Rabies

A feral cat in the Waverly Pines neighborhood in Brunswick has tested positive for rabies. At least three residents were exposed to the cat and have been advised to follow up with a healthcare professional.

Several species of wild animals that are native to coastal Georgia – including raccoons, foxes, and bats – can carry rabies. Rabies is a potentially deadly virus that is primarily spread by infected animals. The Glynn County Health Environmental Health office offers these tips to protect you and your family from rabies:

  • Avoid contact with animals you don’t know.
  • Make sure your pets receive the proper immunizations. Dogs and cats should get rabies vaccines by four months of age, followed by a booster shot one year later, and another one every year as prescribed by your veterinarian.
  • Do not handle, feed, or unintentionally attract wild animals with open garbage cans or by leaving pet food out at night.
  • Never adopt wild animals or bring them into your home. Do not try to nurse sick animals to health. Call animal control or a properly licensed animal rescue agency for assistance.
  • Teach children to never handle unfamiliar animals, wild or domestic, even if they appear friendly. “Love your own, leave other animals alone” is a good principle for children to learn.

Symptoms of rabies in animals include a change in behavior, biting, aggression, showing no fear of natural enemies (such as humans), foaming at the mouth, and paralysis.

If an animal ever bites you, seek medical care immediately and contact Glynn County Animal Control at 912-554-7500 and the Glynn County Health Department Environmental Health office at 279-2940.