The Coastal Health District of Georgia serves the counties of Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long & McIntosh

Chatham News


Request for Proposals (Chatham County)

Sealed Request for Proposals/Request for Qualifications for the “Chatham County Health Department – space conversion for Dental Clinic” will be received by the Chatham County Health Department at 1395 Eisenhower Drive, Savannah, Georgia 31406 until 2:00 p.m. local time on December 18, 2018.  The names of the respondents will be read aloud at 2:10 p.m. of the same day and no further proposals or request for qualifications will be accepted.  Qualifications will subsequently be opened and evaluated by the Department and the proposals submitted by qualified proposers/contractors shall be opened and read aloud at 2:45 p.m.  A mandatory pre-proposal conference with proposers/contractors is to occur on November 27, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the Health Department located at 1395 Eisenhower Drive, Savannah, Georgia 31406. Get more details here:
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11-09-18 RFQ RFP.Final{3094484.1}

Chatham County Health Dept. to Hold Drive-Through Flu Vaccination Clinic Nov. 15

The Chatham County Health Department will hold a drive-through flu vaccination clinic from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday, November 15, at the parking lot across from Goodwill on Sallie Mood Drive in Savannah. Regular flu shots are $29 and high-dose flu shots – made especially to protect those 65 and older – are $55. Cash, checks, credit cards, most major insurances, Medicaid, and Medicare will be accepted.

The flu can cause mild to severe illness and getting the flu vaccine is the best way to protect yourself, your family, and your community from the virus. Every flu season is different and we never know how bad a flu season is going to be or how long it’s going to last which is why it is important for everyone six months of age and older get the flu vaccine every year. It takes about two weeks after getting a flu shot for the vaccine to provide the body protection against the flu. While getting the flu vaccine is the best way to prevent the flu, there are other things we can all do every day to prevent getting or spreading the flu:

  • Avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you get sick with flu-like illness, stay home for at least 24 hours after the fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. The fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.
  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  • Try to cough or sneeze into the corner of your elbow and not your hand or cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.

For more information or to download the consent form ahead of time, go to www.gachd.org/chathamflu.

 

Diabetes Prevention Program Meeting Scheduled for Nov. 19 in Savannah

The Coastal Health District Chronic Disease Prevention Program will hold National Diabetes Prevention Program kickoff meeting from 5:30-6:30 p.m., on Monday, November 19, at the Coastal Health District administrative office located at 420 Mall Blvd. in Savannah.

There are more than 79 million Americans who have prediabetes and many do not know it. In Georgia alone, more than one million people have diabetes and about 44,000 Georgians are diagnosed with diabetes every year. People with prediabetes have blood glucose (sugar) levels higher than normal. The levels are not yet high enough for a type 2 diabetes diagnosis; however, people with prediabetes are more likely to get type 2 diabetes than others. Diabetes can lead to serious health complications, including heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure, or loss of toes, feet, or legs. Even though prediabetes puts you at high risk, there are ways you can lower your chance of getting type 2 diabetes.

The National Diabetes Prevention Program is focused on helping prediabetics avoid type 2 diabetes by making modest lifestyle changes. The Program is free and is designed so that participants receive support not only through a Lifestyle Coach but also from each other by sharing ideas, celebrating successes, and working to overcome obstacles. Participants at high risk for type 2 diabetes will learn how take steps to make positive, sustainable lifestyle changes.

Anyone seeking additional information about the Diabetes Prevention Program can contact Coastal Health District Chronic Disease Prevention Director, Cristina Gibson at 912-644-5818 or email cristina.gibson@dph.ga.gov.

 

Invitation to Bid on Security Services

The Chatham County Health Department in Savannah, Georgia, is soliciting competitive sealed bids from firms that are interested in and capable of providing Security Services; ITB # 2018-111.  The Invitation to Bid is for three properties; 1395 Eisenhower Drive, Savannah, GA, 107 Fahm Street, Savannah, GA and 1602 Drayton Street, Savannah, GA.  Packages can be obtained by contacting the Chatham County Health Department Administrator, Dr. Randy McCall, at 1395 Eisenhower Drive, Savannah Georgia (912)-356-2441.  There will be a mandatory pre-bid meeting on October 26, 2018 at 2 p.m. at 1395 Eisenhower Drive, Savannah, GA.  Interested parties are required to attend.  Bids are due on November 2, 2018 at 2 p.m. and must be submitted to Randy McCall, Administrator.  CHATHAM COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT HAS THE AUTHORITY TO REJECT ALL BIDS AND WAIVE MINOR FORMALITIES.

HIV Medical Director Featured in MD Magazine

Medical Director and Principal Investigator for Coastal Health District’s HIV CARE clinics, Debbie P Hagins, MD, FAPCR, AAHIVS, recently lent her expertise to MD Magazine. Read the article here: First Efficacy Trials on Switch to RPV/FTC/TAF for HIV Yield Positive Results

Flu Shots Start Sept. 24; Drive-thru/Walk-in Clinics Announced

Health departments in Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, and McIntosh counties will begin offering flu vaccine on Monday, September 24. Regular flu shots are $29 and high-dose flu shots – made especially to protect those 65 and older – are $55. Cash, checks, credit cards, most major insurances, Medicaid, and Medicare will be accepted.

To date, the following drive-through flu vaccination clinics have been scheduled:

Camden County
10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Saturday, October 13
Lowe’s
1410 East Boone Ave., Kingsland

Glynn County
8 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Thursday, October 18
Glynn County Health Department
2747 Fourth Street, Brunswick

McIntosh County
9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Tuesday, October 30
McIntosh County Health Department
1335 GA Hwy. 57, Townsend

To date, the following walk-in flu vaccination clinics have been scheduled:

Long County
8 a.m. – 4  p.m.
Tuesday, October 30
584 N. Macon Street, Ludowici

The flu can cause mild to severe illness and getting the flu vaccine is the best way to protect yourself, your family, and your community from the virus. Every flu season is different and we never know how bad a flu season is going to be or how long it’s going to last which is why it is important for everyone six months of age and older get the flu vaccine every year.

Last year’s flu season was particularly severe with widespread flu activity around the state of Georgia and throughout the country. Generally speaking, flu season starts in October and peaks around January or February but it’s not too early to get the flu vaccine. The duration of flu seasons varies but last year’s season lasted well into the Spring.

It takes about two weeks after getting a flu shot for the vaccine to provide the body protection against the flu. While getting the flu vaccine is the best way to prevent the flu, there are other things we can all do every day to prevent getting or spreading the flu:

  • Avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you get sick with flu-like illness, stay home for at least 24 hours after the fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. The fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.
  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  • Try to cough or sneeze into the corner of your elbow and not your hand or cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.

For more information or to download and fill out the consent form ahead of time, go to gachd.org/flu.

Nat’l Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day FREE HIV Testing

The conversation about HIV is changing. #TalkUndetectable this National Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NGMHAAD), Thursday, September 27, and  come in for FREE HIV testing at health departments in Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, & McIntosh counties. National Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NGMHAAD) is observed each year on September 27 to direct attention to the continuing and disproportionate impact of HIV and AIDS on gay and bisexual men in the United States. Get more info. on at http://bit.ly/2xcigOa.

 

Two Raccoons Test Positive for Rabies in Chatham Co.

Two raccoons in Chatham County have tested positive for rabies: One in Thunderbolt and one off East Victory Drive between Bee Road and the Truman Parkway. In both cases, family dogs came into contact with the raccoons. In the first case, three dogs that were up-to-date on vaccinations are under 45-day home observation. In the second case, one dog and three puppies that were not up-to-date on vaccinations and are in quarantine at Chatham County Animal Services.

Several species of wild animals that are native to coastal Georgia – including raccoons, foxes, and bats – can carry rabies. Rabies is a potentially deadly virus that is primarily spread by infected animals. The Chatham County Health Department Environmental Health office offers these tips to protect you and your family from rabies:

  • Avoid contact with animals you don’t know.
  • Make sure your pets receive the proper immunizations. Dogs and cats should get rabies vaccines after 12 weeks of age, followed by a booster shot within one year and vaccination every 1-3 years depending on veterinary recommendation and vaccine used.
  • Do not handle, feed, or unintentionally attract wild animals with open garbage cans or by leaving pet food out at night.
  • Never adopt wild animals or bring them into your home. Do not try to nurse sick animals to health. Call animal control or a properly licensed animal rescue agency for assistance.
  • Teach children to never handle unfamiliar animals, wild or domestic, even if they appear friendly. “Love your own, leave other animals alone” is a good principle for children to learn.

Symptoms of rabies in animals include a change in behavior, biting, aggression, showing no fear of natural enemies (such as humans), foaming at the mouth, and paralysis.

If an animal ever bites you, seek medical care immediately and contact Chatham County Animal Services at 912-652-6575 and the Chatham County Environmental Health office at 912-356-2160.

Raccoon on Wilmington Island Tests Positive for Rabies

A raccoon that stumbled into the backyard of a Wilmington Island home has tested positive for rabies. The family dog was in the backyard at the time and picked the raccoon up in its mouth. The dog was not up-to-date on rabies vaccinations and will remain under observation at Chatham County Animal Services for 45 days.

Several species of wild animals that are native to coastal Georgia – including raccoons, foxes, and bats – can carry rabies. Rabies is a potentially deadly virus that is primarily spread by infected animals. The Chatham County Health Department Environmental Health office offers these tips to protect you and your family from rabies:

  • Avoid contact with animals you don’t know.
  • Make sure your pets receive the proper immunizations. Dogs and cats should get rabies vaccines after 12 weeks of age, followed by a booster shot within one year and vaccination every 1-3 years depending on veterinary recommendation and vaccine used.
  • Do not handle, feed, or unintentionally attract wild animals with open garbage cans or by leaving pet food out at night.
  • Never adopt wild animals or bring them into your home. Do not try to nurse sick animals to health. Call animal control or a properly licensed animal rescue agency for assistance.
  • Teach children to never handle unfamiliar animals, wild or domestic, even if they appear friendly. “Love your own, leave other animals alone” is a good principle for children to learn.

Symptoms of rabies in animals include a change in behavior, biting, aggression, showing no fear of natural enemies (such as humans), foaming at the mouth, and paralysis.

If an animal ever bites you, seek medical care immediately and contact Chatham County Animal Services at 912-652-6575 and the Chatham County Environmental Health office at 912-356-2160.

 

State & Local Public Health Officials Urge Mosquito Precautions

Local Public Health Officials Continue to Encourage Mosquito Precautions
News release from Coastal Health District, August 30, 2018

Public health officials continue to encourage precautions to prevent mosquito bites and breeding. Mosquitoes can carry diseases such as West Nile Virus (WNV) and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE). WNV has been identified in mosquitoes in both Chatham and Glynn counties and EEE has been identified in mosquitoes in Liberty County. Both can diseases can cause mild to serious illness.

Most people who contract WNV and EEE will show no symptoms; however, severe illness is possible. Horse and large animal owners are encouraged to vaccinate their animals against EEE and to clean out watering sources, such as buckets and troughs, every three-to-four days to prevent mosquitoes from breeding there. Mosquitoes that carry the West Nile Virus are more likely to bite during the evening, night, and early morning. The primary mosquito that transmits EEE breeds in freshwater swamps.

Following the 5Ds of prevention can help protect against mosquitoes:

  • Dusk/Dawn – Avoid dusk and dawn activities during the summer when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Dress – Wear loose-fitting, long sleeved shirts and pants to reduce the amount of exposed skin.
  • DEET – Cover exposed skin with an insect repellent containing the DEET, which is the most effective repellent against mosquito bites.
  • Drain – Empty any containers holding standing water – buckets, barrels, flower pots, tarps – because they are breeding grounds for virus-carrying mosquitoes.
  • Doors – Make sure doors and windows are in good repair and fit tightly, and fix torn or damaged screens to keep mosquitoes out of the house.

Georgians Urged to Protect Themselves from Mosquito Bites
West Nile Virus Infections Increase in Georgia
News release from the Georgia Department of Public Health, August 29, 2018

The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) has confirmed seven human cases of West Nile virus so far this year, including one death. Additionally, there has been one confirmed case of Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) which resulted in death. EEE is rare illness in humans, and only a few cases are reported in the United States each year. Georgians are urged to protect themselves from mosquito bites, particularly when they are outside this Labor Day weekend. Mosquito season in Georgia typically lasts through October, sometimes longer depending on the weather. “Georgians can reduce the number of mosquitoes around their homes and yards by getting rid of standing water,” said Chris Rustin, Ph.D., DPH director of Environmental Health. “Standing water is a breeding ground for mosquitoes that may be infected with West Nile virus and other mosquito-borne diseases.” Tip ‘n Toss all containers that can collect water – flowerpots, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, discarded tires and birdbaths – anything that holds water and gives mosquitoes a place to thrive. Mosquitoes that carry West Nile virus look for stagnant water to breed in, so be sure gutters and eaves are clear of leaves and debris. The most effective way to protect against WNV infection and all mosquito-borne diseases is to prevent mosquito bites. Observe the “Five D’s of Prevention” during your outdoor activities this holiday weekend:

  • Dusk/Dawn – Mosquitoes carrying WNV usually bite at dusk and dawn, so avoid
    or limit outdoor activity at these times.
  • Dress – Wear loose-fitting, long sleeved shirts and pants to reduce the amount
    of exposed skin.
  • DEET – Cover exposed skin with an insect repellent containing DEET, which is the most effective repellent against mosquito bites.
  • Drain – Empty any containers holding standing water because they are excellent breeding grounds for virus-carrying mosquitoes.
  • Doors – Make sure doors and windows are in good repair and fit tightly, and fix torn or damaged screens to keep mosquitoes out of the house.

Symptoms of WNV include headache, fever, neck discomfort, muscle and joint aches, swollen lymph nodes and a rash – that usually develop three to 15 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito. The elderly, those with compromised immune systems, or those with other underlying medical conditions are at greater risk for complications from the disease. Anyone with questions about WNV or EEE should speak to their health care provider or call their local county health department, environmental health office.

More information about mosquito-borne illnesses and mosquito repellents can be found at https://dph.georgia.gov/EnvironmentalHealth. Information about West Nile Virus and EEE can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/westnile/ or https://www.cdc.gov/easternequineencephalitis/index.html

About the Georgia Department of Public Health
The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is the lead agency in preventing disease, injury and disability; promoting health and well-being; and preparing for and responding to disasters from a health perspective. DPH’s main functions include: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Maternal and Child Health, Infectious Disease and Immunization, Environmental Health, Epidemiology, Emergency Preparedness and Response, Emergency Medical Services, Pharmacy, Nursing, Volunteer Health Care, the Office of Health Equity, Vital Records, and the State Public Health Laboratory. For more information visit: www.dph.georgia.gov.