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The Coastal Health District of Georgia serves the counties of Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long & McIntosh

News


Free Mammograms for Women in Chatham Co. Who Meet Eligibility Criteria

The Chatham County Health Department’s Breast and Cervical Cancer Program (BCCP) is partnering with the St. Joseph’s/Candler Mobile Mammography Program to offer free mammograms from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Monday, April 30, at the Chatham County Health Department located at 1395 Eisenhower Drive in Savannah. Women who meet certain annual income guidelines and are 40-64 years of age without insurance will be eligible to receive a screening mammogram at no cost.

Appointments are preferred but walk-ins will be accepted. To make an appointment, please call 356-2946.

Click HERE for more information on BCCP.

Long County Board of Health Discusses Flu; Staffing

Updates on flu season, the 2018 Long County Health Department budget, and health department staffing topped the agenda items at Long County Board of Health meeting held in early March.

Board members RoseZena Baggs, Dr. Robert Waters, Mike Riddle, Florence Baggs, Kelly Wingate, and Cathy Stapleton were in attendance along with health department staff and several members of the eight-county Coastal Health District. Coastal Health District Health Director, Dr. Lawton Davis, updated the Board on what has been a long, terrible flu season. Although flu activity is finally starting to decrease across the region and state, there have been 25 flu-associated deaths in the Coastal Health District. None of those deaths occurred in Long County.

Coastal Health District Administrator, Brent Jordan, informed the board that there are no proposed cuts to the Long County Health Department budget. Jordan also presented the revised 2018 fiscal year budget. The proposed 2019 budget will be presented to the Board for approval at the next meeting scheduled for June 14.

The Long County Health Department has a new county nurse manager. Lisa Palmer, R.N., recently joined the health department but is not a newcomer to public health. Palmer joined public health in 1991 as a perinatal case manager and worked with all public health programs for 17 years before joining the Liberty County School System.

“I’m thrilled to be able to come back to public health and look forward to serving the residents of Long County,” said Palmer.

The Long County Health Department is now fully staffed and open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The health department offers a variety of services including immunizations for children and adults, breast and cervical cancer screening for low-income or uninsured women, testing and treatment for sexually transmitted infections, health checks for children, and the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program which provides nutritious foods and nutrition education for low and moderate-income women and children who are at risk of developing nutrition related problems. More information on health department services can be found at gachd.org/long or by calling the health department at 545-2107.

Long County Environmental Health Manager, Linus Woodard notified the Board that there have been 51 septic system permits issued, 17 well water tests performed, nine well water permits issued, and several food service inspections completed since the last meeting. The revised swimming pool regulations will be presented to the Board at the June meeting.

Additional discussion between public health staff and board members took place regarding dangerous dog hearings. The Long County Board of Commissioners recently voted to have members of the Board of Health oversee the animal hearing board should a dangerous dog incident happen. The Board of Health voted on and approved Mike Riddle and Dr. Lawton Davis to lead the animal hearing board.

All Long County Board of Health meetings are open to the public. The next meeting is scheduled for 11 a.m. on Thursday, June 14, at the Long County Health Department located at 584 N. Macon Street in Ludowici.

 

 

 

Georgia Department of Public Health Babies Can’t Wait Program Seeks Public Comment Until May 2, 2018

March 2, 2018                                                                                                                                                         

ATLANTA – The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) Babies Can’t Wait (BCW) program invites interested persons to participate in a 60-day public comment period for the Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2018 Annual State Application under Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Stakeholders, early intervention providers, parents and members of the public are encouraged to comment. The grant application and revised policy may be reviewed online or at locations throughout the state.

Participants can submit comments by mail, email, fax or in person:

  1. Written comments will be accepted by mail until May 2, 2018:
    Babies Can’t Wait
    Attn: Lisa Pennington, Deputy Director Early Intervention
    2 Peachtree Street NW, 11th Floor
    Atlanta, GA 30303-13422
  2. Email comments will be accepted until May 2, 2018:

DPH-MCHDO@dph.ga.gov  (Subject line: Part C or Public Comment)

  1. Fax comments will be accepted until May 2, 2018:
    State BCW office fax: (404) 657-7307
  2. In person comments at a public hearing:
    See available locations below.
District Date/Time Location Contact
Cobb-Douglas

(3-1)

March 15, 2018

4 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Cobb County Board of Health

1738 County Services Road Suite 200

Marietta, GA 30008

 

Yvette James

Early Intervention Coordinator

(770) 319-4717

Yvette.James@dph.ga.gov

Rome

(1-1)

March 22, 2018

4 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Northwest Health District

1309 Redmond Road, NW

Rome, GA 30165

 

Scottie Worthington

Early Intervention Coordinator

(706) 802-5076

Scottie.Worthington@dph.ga.gov

 

Valdosta

(8-1)

March 29, 2018

4 p.m. – 6 p.m.

South Health District

206 S. Patterson Street, 3rd Floor
Valdosta, GA 31603

 

Judy Threlkeld

Early Intervention Coordinator

(229) 245-6565

Judy.Threlkeld@dph.ga.gov

DPH invites interested persons to attend public hearings and present public comments. To allow an opportunity for all to be heard, comments will be limited to five minutes.

About Babies Can’t Wait

The Babies Can’t Wait (BCW) program is Georgia’s statewide early intervention system for infants and toddlers with special needs, from birth to age three, and their families. BCW enhances the capacity of families to meet the special needs of their child to ensure each young child with significant developmental delays achieves his or her maximum developmental potential. To learn more about DPH Babies Can’t Wait program, please call (404) 657-2850 or (888) 651-8224 or visit http://dph.georgia.gov/Babies-Cant-Wait.

About the Georgia Department of Public Health
The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is the lead agency in preventing disease, injury and disability; promoting health and well-being; and preparing for and responding to disasters.

DPH’s main functions include: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Maternal and Child Health, Infectious Disease and Immunization, Environmental Health, Epidemiology, Emergency Preparedness and Response, Emergency Medical Services, Pharmacy, Nursing, Volunteer Health Care, the Office of Health Equity, Vital Records, and the State Public Health Laboratory. For more information about DPH, visit dph.ga.gov.

 

 

Georgia Department of Public Health’s Maternal and Child Health Section Title V Program Seeks Public Comment March 1 – April 15, 2018

March 1, 2018                                                                                                                                                         

PUBLIC NOTICE

 ATLANTA – The Georgia Department of Public Health’s (DPH), Maternal and Child Health, Title V Program invites interested persons to participate in a 45-day public comment period for updates to the Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2019 Annual State Application Guidance. Healthcare and community partners, families and members of the public are encouraged to comment and may review the proposed grant application’s revised guidance online.

Comments will be accepted in three ways:

  1. Email comments will be received until April 15, 2018:

DPH-MCHDO@dph.ga.gov  (Subject line: Title V Public Comment)

  1. Fax comments will be received until April 15, 2018:

State Title V Office fax: (404) 657-7307

  1. Personal comments will be received at a Public Hearing Webinar:

DPH invites interested persons to attend a Public Hearing Webinar at which

proposed changes to national and state performance measures will be

discussed. To allow an opportunity for all to be heard, comments will be limited to

five minutes.

The Title V Block Grant is a federally funded grant provided to 59 U.S. states and jurisdictions. The mission of Title V legislation is to promote the health of women, infants, children and youth, including those with special health care needs, and their families. Activities for the block grant are grouped into five (5) domains or focus areas. These include: women/maternal health, infant/perinatal health, child health, adolescent health, and children with special health care needs. The Maternal and Child Health Section of the Georgia Department of Public Health administers the Title V Block Grant in Georgia.

To learn more about DPH’s Maternal and Child Health Title V Block Program, please call (404) 657-2850 or (888) 651-8224 or visit http://dph.georgia.gov/TitleV

 

Date/Time Webinar Title Contact
March 15, 2018

Noon – 1 p.m.

MCH Title V Guidance Changes for FFY2019 Performance Measures Sherry Richardson, Title V Team Lead

(404) 651-7692

Sherry.Richardson@dph.ga.gov

March 27, 2018

Noon – 1 p.m.

MCH Title V Guidance Changes for FFY2019 Performance Measures Sherry Richardson, Title V Team Lead

(404) 651-7692

Sherry.Richardson@dph.ga.gov

 

To access the webinar, please follow the two steps below.  You will need to complete both steps to join the webinar:

  1. Click on the following link:

https://join.freeconferencecall.com/sherry_richardson

You will be prompted to enter your name and email address, then enter the room.

  1. To join the conference line, please dial the number listed below:

 

Dial in number          1 (605) 475-4764
Access Code            856767#

Due to the high volume of participants who are expected to join this webinar, we recommend that you call in 10 minutes before the start of the webinar. If you get a busy signal, please hang up and call again.

Questions and Comments are encouraged. Please feel free to email your questions to the Georgia Title V Maternal and Child Health Block Grant: DPH-MCHDO@dph.ga.gov.

Agenda
Noon                  Welcome Remarks
12:05 p.m.          Revisions to Program Guidance – Overview/Rationale
12:10 p.m.          National/State Performance Measure Updates
12:15 p.m.          Comment Period (40 minutes)
12:55 p.m.          Closing Remarks

About the Georgia Department of Public Health
The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is the lead agency in preventing disease, injury and disability; promoting health and well-being; and preparing for and responding to disasters from a health perspective. DPH’s main functions include: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Maternal and Child Health, Infectious Disease and Immunization, Environmental Health, Epidemiology, Emergency Preparedness and Response, Emergency Medical Services, Pharmacy, Nursing, Volunteer Health Care, the Office of Health Equity, Vital Records, and the State Public Health Laboratory. For more information about DPH, visit www.dph.georgia.gov.

It’s Not Too Late to Get a Flu Shot

Flu is widespread throughout Georgia and more than 300 people have been hospitalized with flu-related illness across the state. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), flu season usually peaks between December and February; however, flu season can last into spring.

“This has been an extremely rough flu season and the entire country has been hit hard,” said Health Director for the Coastal Health District, Lawton Davis, M.D. “It’s not too late to get vaccinated against the flu and we want to encourage those who have not been vaccinated to take advantage of this opportunity.”

Flu symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills, fatigue, and sometime diarrhea or vomiting.

There are other things we can all do to prevent getting or spreading the flu:

  • Avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you get sick with flu-like illness, stay home for at least 24 hours after the fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. The fever should be gone without the use of fever-reducing medications.
  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  • Try to cough or sneeze into the corner of your elbow and not your hand, or cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.

For more information on this year’s flu season and the flu vaccine, go to cdc.gov/flu.

Additional Flu Information

Flu Inactive Vaccine Information Statement

Flu Inactive Vaccine Information Statement SPANISH

Flu Guide for Parents

Free Mammograms for Women in Chatham Co. Who Meet Eligibility Criteria

The Chatham County Health Department’s Breast and Cervical Cancer Program (BCCP) is partnering with the St. Joseph’s/Candler Mobile Mammography Program to offer free mammograms from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Monday, February 12, at the Chatham County Health Department located at 1602 Drayton Street. Women who meet certain annual income guidelines and are 40-64 years of age without insurance will be eligible to receive a screening mammogram at no cost.

Appointments are preferred but walk-ins will be accepted. To make an appointment, please call 356-2946.

Click HERE for more information on BCCP.

Widespread Flu in Georgia: Protect Yourself and Prevent the Spread of Flu

From the Georgia Department of Public Health
January 12, 2018

If you have not gotten a flu shot yet, do not wait any longer! Flu is widespread in Georgia, and more than three hundred individuals have been hospitalized with flu-related illness. The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) has confirmed four flu-related deaths so far, but that number is expected to increase.

The predominant strain of flu circulating in Georgia and around the country is influenza A (H3N2). This strain can be particularly hard on the very young, people over age 65, or those with existing medical conditions. H3N2 is one of the strains contained in this year’s flu vaccine along with two or three others, depending on the vaccine.

“It is not too late to get a flu shot,” says J. Patrick O’Neal, M.D., DPH commissioner. “Every individual over the age of six months should get a flu vaccine – not just for their own protection, but to protect others around them who may be more vulnerable to the flu and its complications.”

Flu symptoms and their intensity can vary from person to person, and can include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. If you think you have the flu, call or visit your doctor.

In some cases, healthcare providers may recommend the use of antivirals such as Tamiflu® or Relenza®. Antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid, an inhaled powder or an intravenous solution) that fight against the flu in your body. Antiviral drugs work best for treatment when they are started within two days of getting sick. Antivirals are used to treat those at high-risk for flu complications – young children, the elderly, individuals with underlying medical conditions and women who are pregnant. Most otherwise-healthy people who get the flu, however, do not need to be treated with antiviral drugs.

There are other things you can do to help prevent the spread of flu – tried and true measures your mother taught you.

  • Frequent and thorough hand-washing with soap and warm water. Alcohol based gels are the next best thing if you don’t have access to soap and
  • Cover your nose and mouth when coughing and sneezing to help prevent the spread of the flu. Use a tissue or cough or sneeze into the crook of your elbow or arm.
  • Avoid touching your face as flu germs can get into the body through mucus membranes of the nose, mouth and
  • If you are sick, stay home from school or work. Flu sufferers should be free of a fever, without the use of a fever reducer, for at least 24 hours before returning to school or

If you are caring for a sick individual at home, keep them away from common areas of the house and other people as much as possible. If you have more than one bathroom, have the sick person use one and well people use the other. Clean the sick room and the bathroom once a day with household disinfectant. Thoroughly clean linens, eating utensils, and dishes used by the sick person before reusing.

To learn more about influenza log on to www.flu.gov.

 

About the Georgia Department of Public Health

The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is the lead agency in preventing disease, injury and disability; promoting health and well-being; and preparing for and responding to disasters. DPH’s main functions include: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Maternal and Child Health, Infectious Disease and Immunization, Environmental Health, Epidemiology, Emergency Preparedness and Response, Emergency Medical Services, Pharmacy, Nursing, Volunteer Health Care, the Office of Health Equity, Vital Records, and the State Public Health Laboratory. For more information about DPH visit www.dph.ga.gov.

Rabies Precautions Issued in Camden County

A stray cat in Woodbine tested positive for rabies after biting a woman. The incident took place at close to the 12000 block of Hwy. 17 near intersection on Hwy. 17 and Grover Rd. The resident who was bitten has been advised to follow up with a healthcare professional. Increased raccoon activity has also been reported in downtown St. Marys near the elementary school. Camden County residents are encouraged to stay away from and report any animals acting strangely to Camden County Animal Control at 912-576-7395.

Several species of wild animals that are native to coastal Georgia – including raccoons, foxes, and bats – can carry rabies. Rabies is a potentially deadly virus that is primarily spread by infected animals. The Camden County Health Department Environmental Health office offers these tips to protect you and your family from rabies:

  • Avoid contact with animals you don’t know.
  • Make sure your pets receive the proper immunizations. Dogs and cats should get rabies vaccines by four months of age, followed by a booster shot one year later, and another one every year as prescribed by your veterinarian.
  • Do not handle, feed, or unintentionally attract wild animals with open garbage cans or by leaving pet food out at night.
  • Never adopt wild animals or bring them into your home. Do not try to nurse sick animals to health. Call animal control or a properly licensed animal rescue agency for assistance.
  • Teach children to never handle unfamiliar animals, wild or domestic, even if they appear friendly. “Love your own, leave other animals alone” is a good principle for children to learn.

Symptoms of rabies in animals include a change in behavior, biting, aggression, showing no fear of natural enemies (such as humans), foaming at the mouth, and paralysis. If an animal ever bites you, seek medical care immediately and contact Camden County Animal Control at 912-576-7395 and the Camden County Health Department Environmental Health office at 912-729-6012.

Free Mammograms for Women in Chatham Co. Who Meet Eligibility Criteria

The Chatham County Health Department’s Breast and Cervical Cancer Program (BCCP) is partnering with the St. Joseph’s/Candler Mobile Mammography Program to offer free mammograms from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Monday, October 18, at the Chatham County Health Department located at 1602 Drayton Street. Women who meet certain annual income guidelines and are 40-64 years of age without insurance will be eligible to receive a screening mammogram at no cost.

Appointments are preferred but walk-ins will be accepted. To make an appointment, please call 356-2946.

Some Public Health Services to Stop Early on Dec. 8

Health Departments and HIV CARE Centers in Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, and McIntosh counties will suspend operations at 11 a.m. on Friday, December 8, for a software upgrade.

Environmental Health offices in Bryan, Camden, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, and McIntosh counties will also suspend operations at 11 a.m. on Friday, December 8.

The Vital Records office at the Chatham County Health Department will remain open on Friday, December 8.

The Vital Records office at the Glynn County Health Department will be closed on Friday, December 8.

The Chatham County Environmental Health office will remain open on Friday, December 8.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. All services will be available at 8 a.m. on Monday, December 11.