The Coastal Health District of Georgia serves the counties of Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long & McIntosh

Search Results for: healthy 2019


A Healthy 2019

The holidays always bring a flurry of activity including gatherings filled with holiday treats that most of us find hard to resist. As we move in to 2019, we often resolve to live healthier lifestyles. The World Health Organization has Five Tips for a Healthy Diet This New Year that will get you on your way in the food department. But don’t forget about regular exercise. The American Heart Association has some great tips for Long-term Exercise Success.

Don’t put it off any longer. Make a commitment to living a healthier lifestyle this new year!

 

 

 

 

National Nutrition Month



March is National Nutrition Month and a time to focus on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

Below is some information we hope you will find helpful.

Dietary Guidelines
MyPlate, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and food labels can help you create a healthy eating plan that includes a variety of foods from all food groups. Learn more at https://sm.eatright.org/aboutDGA.

Food Safety
Reduce your risk of food poisoning by following these four easy steps: https://sm.eatright.org/4HFSsteps

Dining Out
Restaurant food is meant to look, smell and taste great, and that means nutrition can sometimes fall by the wayside! Try these tips to dine out while sticking to a healthy eating plan: https://sm.eatright.org/diningout

Benefits of Healthy Eating Style
A healthy eating plan can help prevent illnesses and keep you feeling great! Learn about some of the benefits of a healthful diet: https://sm.eatright.org/preventillness

Eating Right Isn’t Complicated
Eating right doesn’t have to be complicated! Start building a smarter plate by choosing fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean protein and low-fat dairy — foods that are packed with the nutrients you need.
Get more tips at https://sm.eatright.org/ERnotcomplicated.

Portion Sizes
A key part of healthful eating is choosing appropriate amounts of different foods. Learn the important differences between the terms “serving size” and “portion size”: https://sm.eatright.org/srvprtnsizes



Protect Your Preteen’s Future: Vaccinate Today

Vaccinate your preteen today so they can have healthy tomorrow.

In an effort to protect every adult and child, the Coastal Health District is joining the Georgia Department of Public Health in recognizing March 11-15, 2019 as Georgia Preteen Vaccine Awareness Week. This week serves as a reminder for parents to talk with their preteens and teens about getting immunized against vaccine-preventable diseases.

“Every parent wants to protect their child from danger, yet many times parents don’t see vaccination as a priority,” said Sheila Lovett, Immunization Program director for the Georgia Department of Public Health. “Vaccinating your child is the single best way to protect them from these preventable diseases, so we urge parents to make this a priority.”

According to the Georgia Department of Public Health Rule (511-2-2), all students born on or after January 1, 2002, entering or transferring into seventh grade and any “new entrant” into eighth -12th grades in Georgia need proof of an adolescent pertussis (whooping cough) booster vaccination (called “Tdap”) AND an adolescent meningococcal vaccination (MenACWY). This law affects all public and private schools including, but not limited to, charter schools, community schools, juvenile court schools and other alternative school settings (excluding homeschool).

Vaccines are the best defense we have against serious, preventable and sometimes deadly contagious diseases. They help avoid expensive therapies and hospitalization needed to treat infectious diseases like influenza and meningitis. Immunizations also reduce absences both at school and after school activities and decrease the spread of illness at home, school and the community.

The CDC currently recommends the following vaccines for preteens and teens:

  • Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis (Tdap)
    • Influenza (flu)
    • Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
    • Meningococcal Disease (MenACWY)

Georgia Preteen Vaccine Awareness Week is an opportunity to raise awareness through schools, health care providers and the media regarding preteen immunizations, particularly Georgia’s pertussis and meningococcal requirements for incoming seventh-grade students. Speak with your physician today to find out if your preteen is up-to-date.

For more information, click here.

School Requirements

  • All students born on or after January 1,2002, and entering or transferring into seventh grade and any new entrant into eighth through 12th grades, in Georgia must provide proof of an adolescent pertussis (whooping cough) booster vaccination (called “Tdap”) and an adolescent meningococcal vaccination (MenACWY).
  • Proof of both vaccinations must be documented on the Georgia Immunization Certificate (Form 3231).
  • If your preteen has not yet received the whooping cough booster shot or meningococcal vaccine, please contact your doctor or local health department.

Join Together To Protect Your Heart and Celebrate #OurHearts During American Heart Month

Cardiovascular disease is the #1 cause of death in all eight of our Coastal Health District counties (Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, and Chatham). Through our health departments and other public health facilities, we promote healthy eating, moving more, and smoke-free living as part of the preventive prescription for control or against development of heart disease. While we promote these things year round, they take on even more significance during American Heart Month every February.

Did you know that people who have close relationships at home, work, or in their community tend to be healthier and live longer? One reason, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), is that we’re more successful meeting our health goals when we join forces with others. To underscore this point and mark American Heart Month this February, NHLBI is launching the #OurHearts movement, to inspire people to protect and strengthen their hearts with the support of others.

Here are some facts, how-to tips, and resources to inspire you to join with others to improve your heart health. 

Heart disease is a leading cause of death in the United States. Most middle aged people (90 to 95 percent) and young adults (75 to 80 percent) have one or more risk factors for heart disease, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or high blood cholesterol, or being a smoker or overweight. Having more than one risk factor increases your risk for heart disease much more than having just one.

Why Reaching Out Is GoodHaving positive, close relationships and feeling connected with others benefits our overall health, including our blood pressure and weight. Having people in our lives who will motivate and care for us helps, but having feelings of closeness and companionship helps our health too.

Making the following heart healthy lifestyle changes will be easier and more successful if you work with other motivated people:

  • Get physically active.
  • Achieve a healthy weight and maintain it.
  • Eat heart healthy foods.
  • Quit smoking.

Remember, you don’t have to make big changes all at once. Small steps will get you where you want to go. Here are some tips to get you going.

Move More
Invite family, friends, colleagues, or members of your community to join you in your efforts to be more physically active:

  • Ask a colleague to walk with you on a regular basis, put the date on both your calendars, and text or call to make sure you both show up.
  • Join an exercise class at your local community center and bring a neighbor along. Carpool to make it a regular date.
  • Grab your kids, put on some music, and do jumping jacks, skip rope, or just dance.
  • Make your social time active and encourage everyone—family and friends alike— to think of fun things that get you off the couch and moving.

If you have a health condition, including heart disease or high blood pressure, talk with your doctor before increasing your activity.

How much is enough? Aim for at least 2½ hours of physical activity each week—that’s just 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. In addition, do muscle strengthening exercises 2 days a week. Can’t carve out a lot of time in your day? Don’t chuck your goal, chunk it! Try 10 or 15 minutes a few times a day. NHLBI’s Move More fact sheet provides ideas to get and keep you moving.

Aim for a Healthy Weight
If you’re overweight, find someone in your friend group, at work, or in your family who also wants to lose weight. (Every little bit can help!) Check in with them regularly to stay motivated or join a weight loss program together. Do healthy activities together, like walking or playing on a neighborhood sports team, and share low-calorie, low-sodium meals or recipes. (Pregnant women should not try to lose weight, but they can exercise.)

Eating Heart Healthy
We tend to eat like our friends and family, so ask others close to you to join you in your effort to eat healthier. Need healthy eating ideas? Try NHLBI’s Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan. It’s free and scientifically proven to lower blood pressure and improve blood cholesterol levels.

Quit Smoking
To help you quit, ask others for support or join a support group. Research has shown that people are much more likely to quit if their spouse, friend, or sibling does. Social support online can also help you quit. All states have quit lines with trained counselors—call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669). You’ll find many free resources to help you quit, such as apps, a motivational text service, and a chat line at the websites BeTobaccoFree.hhs.gov and Smokefree.gov.

If you need extra motivation to quit, consider the health of your friends and family: Being around other people’s smoke, called secondhand smoke, is dangerous. Thousands of adult nonsmokers die of stroke, heart disease, and lung cancer caused by secondhand smoke.

Visit #OurHearts for inspiration on what others around the country are doing together for their heart health. Then join the #OurHearts movement and let NHLBI know what you’re doing with friends, family, or others to have a healthy heart. Tag #OurHearts to share how you’re being heart healthy together.

Cervical Cancer Awareness

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month, and the Coastal Health District wants you to know that there’s a lot you can do to prevent cervical cancer. Each year, more than 11,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer.

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a very common infection that spreads through sexual activity, and it causes almost all cases of cervical cancer. About 79 million Americans currently have HPV, but many people with HPV don’t know they are infected.

The good news?

  • The HPV vaccine (shot) can prevent HPV.
  • Cervical cancer can often be prevented with regular screening tests and follow-up care.

In honor of National Cervical Health Awareness Month, health departments in Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, and McIntosh counties encourage:

  • Women to start getting regular cervical cancer screenings at age 21
  • Parents to make sure pre-teens get the HPV vaccine at age 11 or 12

Teens and young adults also need to get the HPV vaccine if they didn’t get it as pre-teens. Women up to age 26 and men up to age 21 can still get the vaccine.

For more information, check out gachd.org/hpv.

Here are some more great resources:

How to Talk to Your Pre-Teen about HPV Vaccine

HPV Vaccine Information

HPV Safety Fact Sheet for Parents

HPV & Cancer

 

Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes affects more than 30 million people in the United States and more than one out of every three adults have pre diabetes. Diabetes is a major cause of heart disease and stroke. Type 1 diabetes happens when your body doesn’t make enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes happens when your body can’t use insulin properly. Most cases of Type 2 diabetes can be prevented by losing weight, eating healthier, and becoming more active. Check out these tips to reach and stay at a healthy weight.

Carbohydrates and Diabetes
What do carbohydrates have to do with diabetes? A lot. Understanding carbohydrates can help you prevent Type 2 diabetes. This Carb Guide helps breakdown the link between carbs and Type 2 diabetes and provides a good, basic explanation of which carbs are better for you and why.

Long County Health Department

Welcome to the Long County Health Department where we our public health team is dedicated to improving the health of those who live, work, and play in our county by preventing disease and illness, promoting health and well being, and preparing for and responding to disasters.

The Long County Health Department offers services including:

If you have questions about any of our services, please don’t hesitate to call us at the numbers listed below.


Long County Health Clinics and Offices

Please note new health department hours of operation beginning July 1, 2018
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. (closed 12 – 1 p.m.)
Thursday: 8 a.m. – 7 p.m. (closed 12 – 1 p.m.)
Friday: 8 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Health Department
584 N. Macon Street
PO Box 279
Ludowici, GA 31316
View Map
Phone: (912) 545-2107
Fax: (912) 545-2112

Environmental Health Office
584 N. Macon Street
PO Box 279
Ludowici, GA 31316
View Map
Phone: (912) 545-2107
Fax: (912) 545-2112
Hours of Operation:
Monday – Friday: Field-related services
Monday-Thursday: Fee payment, applications, administrative services
8 a.m. – 5 p.m.


Long County Board of Health Meetings
Long County Board of Health meetings are held at 11 a.m. at the Long County Health Dept. located at 584 North Macon Street in Ludowici.

The following meetings have been scheduled for 2019:
March 14
June 13
September 12
December 12



 

Flu Shots Available

Flu season is unpredictable which is why it is recommended that everyone six months and older get vaccinated against the flu every year. Last year’s flu season was very severe and lasted well into the spring months. The health department will offer flu vaccine beginning September 24. Getting vaccinated is the best protection against flu. For more information on the vaccine or to download the vaccine consent form to save time before heading to the health department for your flu shot, check out the Long County Health Department Flu Vaccination Information page.

 


 

Hurricane season is June 1 through November 30 but the Hurricane Registry for those with functional, access, or medical needs is open all year long. The Hurricane Registry for those with functional, access, or medical needs is a list maintained by the health department of residents who may need transportation or medical assistance and have no resources such as family members, neighbors, or friends to help them evacuate if a hurricane is threatening. Residents must apply to be on the Registry. Residents who meet criteria and get on the Registry will be evacuated when there is serious threat of a hurricane.

It is important to note that Registry applications will stop being accepted 72 hours prior to the arrival of tropical storm force winds.

To apply, residents can call toll-free, 1-833-CHD-REGISTER (1-833-243-7344) and follow the phone prompts.

The application and authorization for release of protected health information can also be downloaded here:
Long County Hurricane Registry Application 2018 (Word doc)
Long County Hurricane Registry Application 2018 (PDF)
Protected Health Information Authorization

When both the Hurricane Registry Registration and Consent form and the Protected Health Information authorization forms have been completed, please take them to your health department or mail them to:
Long County Health Dept.
Attn: Lisa Palmer, R.N.
P.O. Box 279
Ludowici, GA 31316

FAX: 912-545-2112

Those with functional or access needs – including children or adults with physical, sensory, or intellectual disabilities who need assistance with the activities of daily living including eating, taking medication, dressing, bathing, communicating, transferring from bed to chair and chair to bed, and toileting – will be evacuated to a gymnasium type setting far enough inland so that they are safe from the storm. The accommodations at the shelter will be basic (a cot with 20-40 square feet of space, bathroom facilities, meals, etc.) and the shelter may be several hours away.

Those with medical needs – including those who need the help of trained medical professionals for things like IV medication or who may be dependent on a respirator or other medical equipment – may be taken to a healthcare facility which will likely be located several hours inland.

Anyone who lives in a nursing home, assisted living, or personal care facility is not eligible for the registry and must follow their facility’s emergency plan. The Registry is truly a last resort but it is important that local emergency management agency and public health department officials have a list of residents who have certain needs and no other way to evacuate should that become necessary.

 

 

 

Immunizations and Vaccinations

            Prevent. Protect. Immunize.

Measles is still common in many parts of the world.  Unvaccinated travelers who get measles in other countries continue to bring the disease into the United States.Give your child the best protection against measles with two doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine: 1st dost at 12-15 months and 2nd dose at 4-6 years. Get the facts about measles.


Immunization Resources

Click HERE for information on travel vaccines.
Click HERE for 2018 immunization schedules and other resources.
Get the lowdown on immunizations:
Infant and Childhood Immunization Facts

Part of living a healthy life is protecting yourself from disease. Immunizations help reduce absences at work, school and social events, and decrease the spread of illness in the home, workplace and community. The Coastal Health District’s various county health departments offer both child and adult immunizations and vaccinations. Call your local health department for more information. Click HERE for recommended immunizations by age.

Religious Objection to Immunization Form
072315 DPH Form 2208 Religious Objection to Immunization[1]

The “Vaccines for Children” Program
Vaccines have been saving lives and preventing serious illness for centuries. Yet, each year, thousands of people die and many more are hospitalized because of infectious diseases, like meningitis, whooping cough, and influenza, known as the flu, that could have been prevented by vaccination. In these tough economic times, more families must choose between health care and other critical needs. Fortunately, there is a federal government program, Vaccines for Children (VFC), which provides vaccines to children and teens at no- or low-cost to uninsured families and others who qualify.

To learn more about the VFC program, click HERE.


School Information

Immunization Requirements for Children Attending Seventh Grade
Effective July 1, 2014, children born on or after January 1, 2002 who are attending seventh grade and new entrants into Georgia schools in grades 8 through 12 must have received one dose of tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccine and one dose of meningococcal (meningitis) vaccine. (“New entrant” means any child entering any school in Georgia for the first time or entering after having been absent from a Georgia school for more than 12 months or one school year).

Immunization Requirements for Georgia Childcare and School Attendance

Vision, Hearing, Dental, and Nutrition Screening Form (3300)
Form 3300

Parents, click here to download “What to Expect: Guide to Immunizations” in English:
What to Expect Guide to Immunizations

Los padres, haga clic aquí para descargar “Qué esperar: Guía de Inmunizaciones” en español:
What to Expect Guide to Immunizations – Spanish

Heading off to College?
If you’ll be attending a Georgia college or university, find out information on required immunizations:
University System of GA Immunization Requirements 04-2011
Some institutions of higher learning may have different immunization requirements. Be sure to check with the college or university you plan to attend to find out what immunizations you will need.


Adult Immunizations

Immunizations aren’t just for children. There are a lot of vaccines recommended to keep adults healthy, as well. Need to know more? This questionnaire will help you decide what vaccines you might need.
Adult Vaccine Questionnaire 


Information for Pregnant Women

If you’re pregnant or planning to conceive, it’s time to give your immunization history some attention.
Some vaccine-preventable infections can pose a serious risk to your health and your unborn baby’s. Check with your doctor to see what you may be missing.
For more information, click HERE.

Important Information on Pertussis (whooping cough)
Pertussis is a very contagious respiratory disease that poses a severe health risk and potential death to infants who can catch it from adults who do not know they are ill with pertussis. During the 2011 Legislative Session the Georgia General Assembly passed House Bill 249, requiring each hospital in the state of Georgia to provide parents of newborns educational information on pertussis disease and the availability of a vaccine to protect against the disease. This law went into effect July 1, 2011.

It is also very important that pregnant women get vaccinated against pertussis.

Pertussis_PregnantWomen_500.jpg

Click here for a larger image: Pertussis & Pregnant Women

Through collaboration with the Georgia Hospital Association, the Georgia Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Georgia Academy of Family Physicians, and the Georgia Obstetrical and Gynecological Society, the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is pleased to provide materials to the public and medical community in support of this legislation. Please visit www.health.state.ga.us/pertussis to view and print English and Spanish educational materials.

McIntosh County Health Department

Welcome to the McIntosh County Health Department where we our public health team is dedicated to improving the health of those who live, work, and play in our county by preventing disease and illness, promoting health and well being, and preparing for and responding to disasters.

The McIntosh County Health Department offers services including:

If you have questions about any of our services, please don’t hesitate to call us at the numbers listed below.


McIntosh County Health Clinics and Offices

Please note new health department and environmental health office hours of operation beginning July 1, 2018
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.  (closed 12 – 1 p.m.)
Tuesday: 8 a.m. – 7 p.m. (closed 12 -1 p.m.)
Friday: 8 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Health Department and Environmental Health Office
1335 GA Highway 57
P.O. Box 231
Townsend, GA 31331
View Map
Phone: (912) 832-5473
Fax: (912) 832-5509


McIntosh County Board of Health Meetings
McIntosh County Board of Health meetings are held at 8:30 a.m. at the McIntosh County Health Dept. located at 1335 Hwy. 57 in Townsend.

The following meetings have been scheduled for 2019:
February 27
May 29
August 28
November 27

Board of Health Minutes
McIntosh BOH Minutes 8.29.18



Flu season is unpredictable which is why it is recommended that everyone six months and older get vaccinated against the flu every year. Last year’s flu season was very severe and lasted well into the spring months. Getting vaccinated is the best protection against flu. For more information on the vaccine or to download the vaccine consent form to save time before heading to the health department for your flu shot, check out the McIntosh County Health Department Flu Vaccination Information page.


Hurricane season is June 1 through November 30 but the Hurricane Registry for those with functional, access, or medical needs is open all year long. The Hurricane Registry for those with functional, access, or medical needs is a list maintained by the health department of residents who may need transportation or medical assistance and have no resources such as family members, neighbors, or friends to help them evacuate if a hurricane is threatening. Residents must apply to be on the Registry. Residents who meet criteria and get on the Registry will be evacuated when there is serious threat of a hurricane.

It is important to note that Registry applications will stop being accepted 72 hours prior to the arrival of tropical storm force winds.

To apply, residents can call toll-free, 1-833-CHD-REGISTER (1-833-243-7344) and follow the phone prompts.

The application and authorization for release of protected health information can also be downloaded here:
McIntosh County Hurricane Registry Application 2018 (Word doc)
McIntosh County Hurricane Registry Application 2018 (PDF)
Protected Health Information Authorization

When both the Hurricane Registry Registration and Consent form and the Protected Health Information authorization forms have been completed, please take them to your health department, mail, or them to:
McIntosh Co. Health Dept.
Attn: Brooke Deverger, R.N.
P.O. Box 231
Townsend, GA 31331

FAX: 912-832-5509

Those with functional or access needs – including children or adults with physical, sensory, or intellectual disabilities who need assistance with the activities of daily living including eating, taking medication, dressing, bathing, communicating, transferring from bed to chair and chair to bed, and toileting – will be evacuated to a gymnasium type setting far enough inland so that they are safe from the storm. The accommodations at the shelter will be basic (a cot with 20-40 square feet of space, bathroom facilities, meals, etc.) and the shelter may be several hours away.

Those with medical needs – including those who need the help of trained medical professionals for things like IV medication or who may be dependent on a respirator or other medical equipment – may be taken to a healthcare facility which will likely be located several hours inland.

Anyone who lives in a nursing home, assisted living, or personal care facility is not eligible for the registry and must follow their facility’s emergency plan. The Registry is truly a last resort but it is important that local emergency management agency and public health department officials have a list of residents who have certain needs and no other way to evacuate should that become necessary.